Welcome to Station Plaza Wine & Spirits

Quinta do Noval Tawny Port 10 year old

$39.00
Save $12.03 (30%)
$26.97

SKU 04108

750ml

Share
The 10 Year Old Tawny port shows intensity of color, complexity, concentration, and depth of flavor. Tinta Roriz, Touriga Francesca and Tinta Barroca predominate among the traditional grape varieties. 50% of the grapes come from the estate (a large part of these now coming from the replantings at Noval in the mid nineties) and 50% from traditional suppliers of "A" category grapes. 100% of grapes are trodden by foot in lagares, and the wine is aged in oak barrels of 640 liters until bottled. A favorite of restaurateurs because it remains fresh for weeks after opening, the Noval Tawny Port has beautiful complexity with vibrant young fruit that blends with the attractive and characteristic dry fruit and nut aromas. It is rich and smooth on the palate, with an elegant structure and long finish.
Category Port
Varietals
Country Portugal
Brand Quinta do Noval
Alcohol/vol 19.5%
  • we91

Wine EnthusiastThe legendary Noval has produced a deliciously attractive, light and poised wine, with fresh fruit and acidity. It is dry in style, with some tannins, and a layer of spirit that is well in balance. The aftertaste floats with acidity and fruit.

Roger Voss, August 1, 2006
  • ws90

Wine SpectatorThis smells just like English Christmas cake. Full-bodied and very sweet, with plenty of toffee and dried fruit character on the finish. Really yummy.

James Suckling, September 15, 2003
  • wa88

Wine AdvocateQuinta do Novel's 10 Year Old Tawny exhibits a light ruby/garnet color, sweet jammy fruit, nice spice, cedar and smoke in the nose, and good concentration. Tawny ports are aged in wood from essentially a solera system for the number of years indicated on the bottle. In most cases I prefer the younger ten or twenty year Tawnys to the ancient forty to fifty year old wines, but it is really a matter of taste. I tend to like more fruit rather than the oxidized and aged characteristics of the very old tawnys.

Robert Parker, October 1996